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Newtown Tragedy

I’m sure there have been many a blog post since the awful news last week.

It made me sick when I heard about the poor little boys and girls who lost their lives for no reason, and the teachers who tried to save them. I will not mention the name of the monster who did it to them, not through fear, but simply because he doesn’t deserve to be remembered.

I cannot even begin to understand the feelings of the parents who lost their most loved in this senseless manor. But I can say I hope they know how it has touched so many people across the globe. No parent should ever bury their child. It is not the natural way of things.

I wish them all my dearest condolences during this time, and forever more.

I let my son eat cake for dinner and stay up extra late having cuddles on the sofa. I can’t imagine him not being there. And yet, on a normal day, like any other, this is what so many parents have had to face.

I read a very interesting article today, about being the mother of a mentally ill child. It is deeply sobering, and highlights just how little support there is for those suffering from a mental illness. It seems that too often, a child cannot be helped until a crime is committed. Why do we wait for these incidents to occur before giving support? It seems ludicrous.

No matter what happens in the future, with regards to gun laws and support for families coping with mental illness, it doesn’t bring back those who were lost last week. They should be remembered, and will never be forgotten.

On my Facebook page a viral quote popped up over the weekend, attributed to Morgan Freeman, although he never said such a thing. I agree with the sentiment entirely. So even though it was actually written by “Mark in Vancouver”, I’m still going to post it.

Thanks for reading.

“You want to know why. This may sound cynical, but here’s why.

It’s because of the way the media reports it. Flip on the news and watch how we treat the Batman theater shooter and the Oregon mall shooter like celebrities. Dylan Klebold and Eric Harris are household names, but do you know the name of a single victim of Columbine? Disturbed people who would otherwise just off themselves in their basements see the news and want to top it by doing something worse, and going out in a memorable way. Why a grade school? Why children? Because he’ll be remembered as a horrible monster, instead of a sad nobody.

CNN’s article says that if the body count “holds up”, this will rank as the second deadliest shooting behind Virginia Tech, as if statistics somehow make one shooting worse than another. Then they post a video interview of third-graders for all the details of what they saw and heard while the shootings were happening. Fox News has plastered the killer’s face on all their reports for hours. Any articles or news stories yet that focus on the victims and ignore the killer’s identity? None that I’ve seen yet. Because they don’t sell. So congratulations, sensationalist media, you’ve just lit the fire for someone to top this and knock off a day care center or a maternity ward next.

You can help by forgetting you ever read this man’s name, and remembering the name of at least one victim. You can help by donating to mental health research instead of pointing to gun control as the problem. You can help by turning off the news.”

5 Ways You Can Help Sandy Hook Shooting Victims

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Double Milestone Day

The day before yesterday, Henry decided to surprise us both by showing us that he is growing up. I was in our bedroom, and my other half was in the nursery, presumably changing Henry’s nappy. I could hear over the baby monitor the sound of them playing together and having a morning chat.

‘Henryyyy. How are you this morning?’

‘Babababababa.’

‘Oh, really? So you had a nice sleepy, did you?’

‘Dadadadadadadada.’

‘Can you say dada?’

‘Daddy.’

‘Did you just say daddy?’

‘Daddy.’

And so it went, that mum lost the race to be the first ever distinguishable word to be spoken by our son. And I was so proud of him that I didn’t even care. Henry’s daddy and I were both grinning like idiots for the rest of the day. What a clever boy!

But just a few hours later, with Henry crawling around the floor, I turned around to see him clinging onto the edge of the tv unit, standing up. He’d pulled himself up from crawling position for the first time on his own. Once he’d figured out how to do it, he repeated this on the side of the sofa, and decided that standing was far better than crawling.

He’s becoming a little boy right before our very eyes. He’s not even eight months yet, and he’s doing all this. I can’t believe how quick it’s going, but I am very proud of him. Now I get why people go on and on about their children. I don’t mind in the slightest indulging other parents in this anymore! It’s just the best feeling, there really is nothing like being a parent.